Do You think J K Rowling should stop #Writing ?


So this is my plea to JK Rowling. Remember what it was like when The Cuckoo’s Calling had only sold a few boxes and think about those of us who are stuck there, because we can’t wave a wand and turn our books into overnight bestsellers merely by saying the magic word. By all means keep writing for kids, or for your personal pleasure – I would never deny anyone that – but when it comes to the adult market you’ve had your turn. Enjoy your vast fortune and the good you’re doing with it, luxuriate in the love of your legions of fans, and good luck to you on both counts. But it’s time to give other writers, and other writing, room to breathe.”

J K Rowling Lynn Shepherd

J K Rowling Image via Daniel Ogren

This is what I read on my feed this morning. Curious, because the link was to Hufftington Post, I clicked  through to the article. Lynn Shepherd basically says that she hasn’t read a word of Potter, but since Rowling, just by virtue of her fame alone, can turn a non-seller to a mega-bestseller, she should stop writing.

I’d like to say a few things to Lynn Shepherd, who I understand is a literary mystery writer. I’d like you guys to tell me if you disagree/ agree with any/ all of it.

Dear Lynn Shepherd,

1. Writing is like golf, you’re your only competitor. Someone else’s success doesn’t automatically ensure your failure. If you are a writer, it’s because you have a story to tell. What other reason is there? How does someone else selling a gazillion copies play into it?

2.  It wasn’t just that the hype was drearily excessive, or that (by all accounts) the novel was no masterpiece and yet sold by the hundredweight, it was the way it crowded out everything else, however good, however worthwhile. That book sucked the oxygen from the entire publishing and reading atmosphere. And I chose that analogy quite deliberately, because I think that sort of monopoly can make it next to impossible for anything else to survive, let alone thrive.”

The publication of a mega best seller actually helps the ecology of writing: it draws more folks into reading, it encourages publishers to take more chances because their pockets are deeper.

3.    By all means keep writing for kids, or for your personal pleasure – I would never deny anyone that – but when it comes to the adult market you’ve had your turn.”

Writing for children is way harder than writing for adults. So stop patronizing those who write Children’s fiction or YA. Or maybe try writing some.

4. If you’re going to ask an author to stop publishing her writing, you should have read at least one of her books. She worked hard at writing those novels– and kept writing despite adversities.

5. When Rowling first broke into the industry, there were mega-sellers before her. That didn’t prevent her from selling. Amanda Hocking self-published her way to stardom, this was post-Rowling. So, there’s enough oxygen for all of us to breathe.

6. Rowling didn’t expect to sell at all, her agent told her she wouldn’t make any money. She was rejected by 12 publishers. I met one of them, and his fave dinner story was his tragedy of rejecting Rowling. No one knows what will make a book sell, so it is pointless to accuse a more successful colleague of your failure.

Could the Potter books use a better editor? Definitely. Would we have had less of a noise about The Casual Vacancy and The Cuckoo’s Calling if it weren’t for the hallowed Rowling name? Absolutely.

Does Rowling’s work have as much literary merit as Alice Munro or Toni Morrison or Franz Kafka or Ernest Hemingway or Amy Hempel or Lydia Davis?

In my own, very subjective opinion? 

Possibly not. (I have read all these authors, and worship all of them. I loved reading Rowling as well and have read all the Potters, and The Cuckoo’s Calling.)

But does JK Rowling have the right to write whatever she wants, when she wants, and publish it? Hell, yeah.

As long as she has a story to tell, in my not so humble opinion, she should be able to tell it. At the end of the day, that’s why a writer writes at the core of it all, in order to write. Not to please other writers (All Nobel Laureates should stop writing, then). Not even to please readers. (Stephen King would stop writing too, in that case, because his readers are happy).

As a writer, dear Lynn Shepherd, I don’t understand those in my profession who want to pull their colleagues down. And how do you think this article of yours is going to win over more readers and writers to your side?

Damyanti

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Do You, dear reader, think JK Rowling should stop writing just because she sells a gazillion copies with each book she writes? Does Shepherd’s article have anything to do with rumors of a seven-part crime series from Rowling?

Want to talk to the Hottest #Creative #Writing #Teacher I know?


 As part of my ongoing guest post series in this blog, Scott Bryson, the editor of Cigale Literary Magazine answered questions a week ago on what leads him to choose a short story for his publication. 

Today I give you  Suzy Vitello Soule, den-mom for the hottest writing group in Portland with names like Chuck Palahniuk, Chelsea Cain, Diana Page Jordan, Cheryl Strayed,  Lidia Yuknavitch. She talks to us about her famous writing group, her reading, her writing, her teaching, and last, but not the least, The Moment Before, her new book.

Suzy Vitello Soule

The Moment Before

1.  In your experience, what should an author keep in mind while creating or joining a writing group? What sort of group dynamic brings out the best writing from its participants?  

Chemistry, I’d say. Which is a bit of a crap shoot, isn’t it? The kernel of our group began with a local mentor, Tom Spanbauer, and morphed from there. We’re big on “no homework,” meaning, we give feedback on the spot after a participant reads his/her pages. It develops a critical muscle to do it this way, but it also lets loose a knee-jerk emotional response to the work, which is valuable, but takes time to navigate as the recipient.

2. You teach creative writing. Could you tell us more about it?  Where can we find your classes? What do you like best about teaching creative writing and what puts you off?

I’ve found a great place to teach, LitReactor – an online writing community which attracts a wonderful and diverse array of teachers and students. Look for my next class in April. I’ll soon firm up what I’ll be teaching.

What I love about teaching creative writing is that I learn so much from my students as I follow their paths, their stories, their hearts. As far as what’s off-putting, every once in a while there pops up a pedantic know-it-all who seems closed off to the journey. But that is very, very rare at LitReactor.

3. Your writing is vivid and forceful, and I love how you use details to bring your characters to life. Technically, what do you find the most easy part of writing, and which part do you find the hardest?

Thank you! I enjoy the initial foray into new territory, surprising myself. I suppose the hardest thing is to trust that, eventually, the sentences will take shape in a way that approximates the feeling in my heart. Patience is not my strength. I want it all NOW!

Revision is so underappreciated. When you back away from your initial sprint and allow your subconscious to engage, you (magically, it seems) have access to a more technical and objective part of your brain. It’s that combination of authentic outburst and craft and rigor that finds its way into the hearts of others.

4. If you had to give just three pointers on ‘writing technique’ to an aspiring author, what would they be?

1.Read your work out loud.

2.Enter into that space of the unknown by unpacking the smaller moments and following your depth of inquiry.

3.Resist completing energy in dialogue. In other words, take the reader someplace new instead of resolving conflict within scenes.

5. If you had to choose three of your favorite authors and their best works, which would they be? Why did you choose these in particular?

I absolutely adore Laurie Halse Anderson. Wintergirls and her new one, The Impossible Knife of Memory. Her precision with voice, her accuracy, and her fresh approach show me how exciting that sort of discipline can be. I also love stories by Antonya Nelson.  Her irony is masterful. Oh, and Tom Perrotta’s Little Children. A creepily delicious book.I’m a fan of contemporary realism, I suppose. And darkness. Always a pinch of darkness.

6. Which of your characters is closest to your heart, and why?

I’m pretty sure I don’t have a standout favorite. My main characters tend to be heroines who are a bit, shall we say, left of normal. Lily, Brady, Liz and Sisi – they are the four main characters in the three books I’ve written and rewritten recently. What fascinates me about these characters is the ways in which they discover their strengths during their meander through my psyche. They all start out in crisis. All seem to have experienced a level of maternal abandonment, and so, I become their mother as I write them through peril and eventually shepherd them to a better place.

7. Tell us about your newly released book, The Moment Before.

It’s a love story. Between the author and the city in which the book takes place. Between the main character, Brady, and her dead sister, Sabine. And, subtly, between Brady and Connor, the boy who also loved Sabine, but was implicated in her death. That’s more than a run-of-the-mill love triangle, yes? More like a love web.

8. What was the spark of the story, and what was the writing process like? Who is your target audience?

Brady had been living inside of me for quite some time, and when I sat down to write a book that began with the death of a loved one, her voice permeated my every thought. The story crystallized around a plot whereby Brady would discover things about herself – strengths, weaknesses, her capacity to love – as she uncovered more information about Sabine.  

My target audience is young adult, but I’m finding that my readers are less definable by age than by their expectations of story. Looking over reviewer comments, it appears that Moment appeals most to a certain type of indie reader. Readers who tend to enjoy the nuances in humanity and enjoy a more lyric and wistful approach to coming of age. Plus, there’s that Keep Portland Weird vibe running throughout.

Suzy is giving away a copy of THE MOMENT BEFORE book (an e-version), plus an electronic version of Averil Dean’s new erotic thriller, ALICE CLOSE YOUR EYES, to two randomly selected commenters a week after this posts. So if you’re leaving a comment here, you might expect a copy of one of these wonderful books!

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Suzy Vitello Soule

Suzy Vitello Soule

About Suzy Vitello Soule: As a founding member of what the Oregonian has dubbed Portland’s “hottest writing group,” (whose members include Chuck Palahniuk, Chelsea Cain, Lidia Yuknavitch, Monica Drake and Cheryl Strayed), Suzy’s name has graced the acknowledgement pages of many a book. Her own award-winning writing has appeared in a bunch of journals and anthologies. THE MOMENT BEFORE is her debut novel. Suzy lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband, Kirk, and son, Carson.

Find out more about Suzy’s projects on www.suzyvitello.com, where you can also read the first chapter of The Moment Before.

Buy The Moment Before here, the linked page leads you to all sorts of places on the web the book is selling at, including Amazon.

Become her friend on Facebook, and follow her on Twitter.

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Blurb of The Moment Before: “Don’t get me wrong. I loved my sister. I never, not once, wished her dead.”

Brady and Sabine Wilson are sisters born eleven months apart, but they couldn’t be more different. Popular Sabine, the head cheerleader dating the high school hunk, seems to have all the luck, while her younger, artsy sister “Brady Brooder” is a loner who prefers the sidelines to the limelight.

After Sabine dies in a horrific cheerleading accident, grief unravels Brady and her family. Once recognized for her artistic talent, 17-year-old Brady finds herself questioning the value of everything she once held dear. Her best friend betrays her. Her parents’ marriage is crumbling. And the boy everyone blames for the accident seems to be her only ally in the search for answers in the wake of her sister’s death. As an unlikely friendship emerges, Brady learns more about Sabine – and love – than she bargained for.

Would you read The Moment Before? Do you have raging questions related to creative writing or her book that you want to ask Suzy Vitello?

Dear Writer, How did You start your writing journey?


 Today, I’m thrilled to welcome on this blog  Suchen Christine Lim, one of Singapore’s best known authors and also a kind, cheerful personality when it comes to teaching creative writing.

In October this year Suchen’s latest novel, The River’s Song was launched in Singapore (click here to watch Suchen read dramatic excerpts from her novel at the launch and answer audience questions). As part of the ongoing writer’s guest post series in this blog, she talks us today about the beginning of her writing journey (all emphasis below are mine).

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Thank you to Damyanti for inviting me onto Daily (W)rite.

I didn’t start writing till I was in my mid 30s.  As a child, I’d wanted to be a hawker selling chicken rice porridge or be an astronaut flying to the moon.  My writing adventure began one hot afternoon with a mindless doodle. I was a college teacher invigilating a 3-hour literature exam when I found myself doodling. The doodles turned into words and the words into sentences. I wrote one page that afternoon. After that, I continued to write, usually an hour or so stealthily before or after school.  I didn’t want anyone to know what I was doing because I didn’t know what or why I was writing.  

At first, I thought it was a story for young people, but the story grew and changed as I wrote. Finally I left teaching and returned to the university, not because I wanted another degree, but so that I could have more time to write. This was my secret motive.

Every morning I left home at 6 am with my Olivetti manual typewriter, and took the bus to Adam Road where I could walk past the Chinese cemetery and be alone with my thoughts before I took another bus to the university. By 7.30 am I was writing /typing in the students’ canteen until my first lecture of the day. I did this every day even though I didn’t know where my writing was going.

Looking back, I’d say that the start of my writing journey was like love at first sight. It’s like you’ve never met this stranger called the Muse before, yet you desperately wanted him/her.  It’s crazy.

One day, a visiting professor who had observed me typing in the noisy canteen, offered me the use of her room. She was going away for 3 months.  I was thrilled. For the first time in my life, I had a room of my own to write in. But my joy didn’t last. One evening the door of ‘my’ room banged open. ‘Clear out!’ the Head of the Sociology Department yelled. I had broken a rule. Students were not allowed to use a professor’s room. ‘Get out and clear out!’ he shouted.

On the bus home, tears streamed down my face. I was 36 years old, the mother of 2 sons and an only daughter. No one, not even my mother, had ever yelled at me like that before. At home, my tears turned to anger. My family urged me to ‘return the anger’ to the uncouth professor. So the next day, accompanied by my friend, the former editor of the Singapore University Press, I banged open the professor’s door! Just like what he did to me, but I didn’t shout. He demanded to know the purpose of my visit. I can’t remember exactly what I said to him. But I remember pacing up and down his office as I delivered my speech. ‘So? You want to complain to the Vice-Chancellor?’ he sneered. ‘Yes,’ I said and marched out of his office.

He rushed after me and came face to face with his former classmate. ‘Ros,’ he smiled at the editor of the Singapore University Press. ‘Your friend. So impulsive.’ he pointed to me. ‘Ros,’ I pointed to him. ‘Your friend. So rude.’ Then I told him that one day, I would write about this incident.

So thank you for giving me the chance to get it off my chest. I detest men who shout abuse at women and children.

I finished writing what turned out to be Rice Bowl, my first novel, in the storeroom of the Singapore University Press.  You can say that I wrote my first novel surrounded by all the unsold books of the university’s professors. If that was not passion laced with madness, I don’t know what is.

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The River's Song by Suchen Christine Lim

The River’s Song by Suchen Christine Lim

About The River’s Song: Ping, the daughter of Chinatown’s Pipa Queen, loves Weng, the voice of the people, but family circumstances drive them apart. Ping is forced to leave suddenly for the USA, while Weng is sent to prison for his part in local protests. Many years later, Ping returns to a country transformed by prosperity. Gone are the boatmen and hawkers who once lived along the river. In their place, rise luminous glass and steel towers proclaiming the power of the city state. Can Ping face her former lover and reveal the secret that has separated them for over 30 years? A beautifully written exploration of identity, love and loss, set against the dramatic upheaval unleashed by the rise of Singapore, about which The Sunday Times Singapore wrote: ‘ – unashamedly details Singapore’s past and present in gripping stories – The River’s Song – is among the best prose to come out of Singapore.’

The River’s Song would be published by Aurora Metro Books, UK in spring 2014.

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Suchen Christine Lim

Suchen Christine Lim

Author Bio: Born in Malaysia but educated in Singapore, Suchen Christine Lim was awarded the Southeast Asia Write Award 2012. In 1992, her novel, Fistful Of Colours, won the Inaugural Singapore Literature Prize. Critics have described her first novel, Rice Bowl, as “a landmark publication on post-independence Singapore”, and A Bit Of Earth as “a literary masterwork as well as a historical document” that was “un-put-downable – a sure sign of a master storyteller.” A short story in The Lies That Build A Marriage, was made into a film for national television.
Awarded a Fulbright grant, she is a Fellow of the International Writers’ Program in the University of Iowa, and its International Writer-in-Residence. In 2005, she was writer-in-residence in Scotland, and has returned to the UK several times as an Arvon Tutor to conduct writing workshops and read at the Edinburgh Book Festival. Her new novel, The River’s Song, will be launched in London and New York next spring.

(This is the first part of her interview. The next, in which Suchen Christine Lim talks about the various genres she’s written in, her take on a writer’s role in history and her views as a creative writing teacher will be published coming Thursday.)

So, to the writers amongst you: do You have interesting stories to share with us about your writing journey? Did You face challenges in your writing journey like Suchen Christine Lim?

 

Cherie Reich: Magna’s Plea


Today I’m excited to introduce blog friend and fellow-writer Cherie Reich‘s work on Daily (w)rite. She is an inspiration on her blog, through her writing and her book reviews.

Here’s more about her latest release: Magna’s Plea.

Magna's Plea by Cherie Reich

Magna’s Plea by Cherie Reich

Book Description: A princess will rise and challenge Fate.
While her father, brothers, and people fight against the Kingdom of Apentha, tenacious eighteen-year-old Princess Magna can only watch the destruction of Amora, her besieged city and kingdom. Her mother, Queen Vyvian, has refused to allow her heir to join the fray.
But Magna won’t take no for an answer. She seeks out an end of the war from Prince Cyrun of Apentha, their prisoner. If she can’t persuade him toward peace, then Amora may fall.

Here’s an excerpt from Cherie Reich’s latest offering, Magna’s Plea :

Amora

12-13 Days of Luquiry

Year 1717 AUC

Tendrils of smoke swirled heavenward. The smoldering stench reached Princess Magna at the top of the palace’s northern tower. She wrinkled her nose at the unpleasant odor, yet it still smelled better than the filth plaguing the besieged seven-hilled city.

She’d vowed to protect Amora. Her heart shattered a little more each day at the devastation afflicting her kingdom.

The once grassy and flower-filled plain sprouted dust plumes from the trampling feet. As the sun neared the western horizon, a bloody hue washed over the battlefield. Tiny, metallic dins and men’s shouts rang out. Magical bursts flashed in the sky like Thean’s lightning, beautiful and deadly. A wooden catapult hurled a human-sized stone slab into the city’s wall. Magna jerked away from the opened window she stood before, as if the object had struck her instead. Rock crumbled from the impact, but the barrier held.

When the reddish orb sank lower, the fighting ceased. War’s chaos parted into two orderly sides, and soldiers crossed the field to gather their dead.

She brushed a shaky hand over her cheeks. Tears dampened her face, and she struggled to turn away from the battle before her. Almost two months had passed since the Apenthans had begun their attack Amora. How much longer could the Amorans—she—stay safe behind their impenetrable wall?

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This short story prequel includes a sneak peek of Reborn, Book One of The Fate Challenges, forthcoming May 2014.
YA Epic Fantasy
The Fate Challenges #0.5
A 5500-word Short Story

To download this short story for free: Amazon / Nook / iTunes / Kobo / Smashwords / Goodreads

Read online at Wattpad, Add to Goodreads

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Magna's Plea by Cherie Reich

Magna’s Plea by Cherie Reich

About the Author: A self-proclaimed bookworm, Cherie Reich is a speculative fiction writer, freelance editor, book blogger, and library assistant living in Virginia. Her short stories have appeared in magazines and anthologies, and her books include the horror series Nightmare, a space fantasy novella trilogy titled Gravity, and the fantasy series The Foxwick Chronicles. She is Vice President of Valley Writers and a member of the Virginia Writers Club and Untethered Realms.  Her debut YA Epic Fantasy novel Reborn, book one in The Fate Challenges, will be released on May 23, 2014.

Website / Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Goodreads / Wattpad

Do You Edit as You Write? #amwriting advice by Cinda Crabbe MacKinnon


Today at Daily (w)rite, we’re getting to know author Cinda Crabbe MacKinnon, an author of short stories, articles, and the novel A Place in the World.

A pLace in the World

A pLace in the World

Q: What is the book about?

A: The novel is called A Place in the World and is set in the cloud forests of Colombia.  The story is about a young biologist ex-pat who marries a Colombian and goes to live on his family’s remote coffee finca (farm).  Calamities strike one after another and Alicia ends up running the finca alone.

Q: What was the inspiration behind your story?

A: I grew up in Latin America and the places and people have stayed in my heart and mind through the years.  You could call it a tribute, but like most writers the story was simply in my head. It was my excuse to study and write about the rainforest as well as the culture. (When I first moved to the States for university I wanted to be a rainforest biologist.)

Q: How did you come up with the title?

A: I came up with the title fairly early in the game. A Place in the World is a double entendre as it is both about a certain place – a coffee finca surrounded by an emerald forest – but also about a young woman finding her place in the world.

 Q: Tell us about your cover art .

A: A cover is an important element since it is the first thing one sees.  I had a definite notion of what I wanted, but it took me a long while to find it.  The art work is a painting by Martin J. Heade of a cloud forest and has been a favorite of mine for years.  It captures the essence of the book and is quite beautiful.

 Q: How did you develop your characters?

A : Both consciously and unconsciously.  One thing I do in the beginning is draw up detailed biographies for myself of each member of the cast.  Even though I don’t use all the information I want to know their backgrounds and the personality traits – but sometimes the characters surprised me.  Peter for example was supposed to be a “bad boy” but he turned out to be a romantic interest and a solid man.  I knew Alicia had to evolve from a naïve young woman into a capable and confident person although she just seemed to do this on her own.

 Q: What would you call your genre – why did you choose it?

A : It chose me. I like to think of it as mainstream or literary – that’s what I read mostly.  Is multicultural a genre?  My publisher listed it also as a “romantic adventure”.

Q: Tell us about your writing process. Do you edit as your write?

A : I edited as I wrote and I don’t advise it!  I would finish a chapter and compulsively rewrite instead of moving on with the story. It is better to power through a rough draft and then rewrite …and rewrite again. I began writing scenes as they came to me and then stitching them together without knowing how the story would end.  I needed structure however, so I soon came up with an outline and the realization that I had to decide on the ending.  Until you have your ending you cannot foreshadow and develop your plot.

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Cinda MacKinnon

Cinda MacKinnon

Cinda Crabbe MacKinnon grew up in Latin America. Her experiences and love for the people, culture and natural setting of Colombia resulted in this novel. A writer, former university lecturer, and environmental scientist, she has an MS in geology and a longtime passion for botany. This background enabled her to weave in details on tropical nature and geology, as well as Colombian society, into her writing. She lives in northern California with her husband and their golden retriever.

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Find Cinda:

Website/Blog
Goodreads

VirtualBookworm(for other vendors:ISBN: 978-0-9888483-0-6)

Reviews, e-book and softcover 

Teaser Tuesday: A Stephen King #Book


This Tuesday, it is time for the teaser again, and this time it is a book my husband downloaded : 11/12/63.

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Here are two teaser sentences from 11/12/63 by Stephen King:

“I knew where I was; Lisbon Falls, Maine, deep in the heart of Androscoggin County. The real question was when I was.”

Blurb: “If you had the chance to change the course of history, would you? Would the consequences be what you hoped?

Jake Epping 35 teaches high school English in Lisbon Falls, Maine, and cries reading the brain-damaged janitor’s story of childhood Halloween massacre by their drunken father. On his deathbed, pal Al divulges a secret portal to 1958 in his diner back pantry, and enlists Jake to prevent the 11/22/1963 Dallas assassination of American President John F. Kennedy. Under the alias George Amberson, our hero joins the cigarette-hazed full-flavored world of Elvis rock n roll, Negro discrimination, and freeway gas guzzlers without seat belts. Will Jake lurk in impoverished immigrant slums beside troubled loner Lee Harvey Oswald, or share small-town friendliness with beautiful high school librarian Sadie Dunhill, the love of his life?”

When I started the book I hadn’t read either the blurb or any reviews, just read the first page and gone on from there. I do that a lot with books on e-readers. So I had no idea this was an alternative history. Now that I’ve started it, Mr. King has persuaded me to keep reading the sort of book I would normally never start on. Let’s see where this journey takes me.

Can You Invent a City?


The Urban Utopia of Time in Honduras

The Urban Utopia in Honduras

I’m not talking about Monopoly here , or any other board game. This is a real-time experiment Honduras is planning to undertake for the sake of economic development. Sounds like a fiction scenario, but it isn’t.

I recently came across this article, and it made me wonder about the possibilities of such an ambitious, unapologetic social experiment in creating an urban utopia:

The Honduran initiative was inspired by Paul Romer, a New York University economist who promoted what he calls “charter cities” at a TED talk in 2011. Rather than experimenting on existing cities, which could provoke resistance, Romer proposed building new urban areas on vacant land with room for several million residents who choose to live there.

The cities would remain Honduran but would enjoy a high degree of autonomy. They would be governed through charters made up of tried-and-tested political, economic and social regulations gleaned from around the world. Partner nations would provide guidance and oversight on troublesome issues like law enforcement and the courts.

For example, the Honduran judicial system is widely viewed as slow and corrupt, a factor that concerns foreign investors. To provide legal stability, the island nation of Mauritius has agreed to allow its Supreme Court to serve as the court of appeals for a future Honduran charter city.

Another proposal is to ban physical currency in the new cities and rely on debit cards and electronic payments to reduce crime and corruption. It sounds radical, but Nigeria has already placed limits on bank withdrawals and deposits to discourage cash transactions in Lagos, Abuja and other cities….

…The plan’s many skeptics warn that Honduras could become a laboratory animal for foreign social scientists. Angel Orellana, a former lawmaker and attorney general, calls the plan 21st-century colonialism. Hondurans, he said, would be giving up a piece of national territory that would become a virtual foreign protectorate.

I can see a novel set in this city. A thriller, or a period piece, or even science fiction. As writers, we sometimes create cities from our imagination. In this case, people with the right amount of money would be building a city from scratch, and decide the political, economical, social and perhaps even cultural rules by which it would run.

Is it possible to create an ideal urban utopia? Do you think this city would become a shining example of a technologically advanced metropolis or get mired in drugs, gambling, and prostitution? Can you really invent an actual city?