How Do You Make #Blogging Friends?


Blogging friends are made through blogs. Simple, right?

But I think like all human relationships—- making blogging friends take one thing, an investment in time. I met most of my blog friends because I took care to get to know them.

Team Damyanti: Working together to make a better A to Z Challenge

Team Damyanti: Working together to make a better A to Z Challenge

I was a compulsive lurker before– I visited blogs without making comments, but over the years, I changed that, took some time to have some conversations– not just via the blogs, but via FB and Twitter. I talk about cross connection on social media in this post on the A to Z Blogging Challenge blog. Go check it out if you want more followers on social media. (Sign up for the challenge now if you haven’t yet– we’ve hit 600 bloggers already!)

Today, I announced my A to Z Blogging Challenge team  (please go check them out and leave them some comment love)–and I’ve had an association, long or short, with all these ladies. Most of them through the challenge, and I love Lee for setting it up and my co-hosts (Lee, Alex, Tina, Jeremy, Nicole, Stephen, Heather, AJ, MJ and Pam) for helping organize it. If you read the #TeamDamyanti bios, you’ll find they are a diverse, very intelligent and creative team– and in working with them I’m finding out just how enthusiastic they can be!

I met Anna during the challenge and before, and have also met her in person when I went to Malaysia. I met Guilie over my flash fiction, and we’ve always kept in touch on Twitter. I met Vidya via the challenge, and have kept in touch over Twitter and FB. I met Jemima over her books, while hosting her last year, I met Csenge while doing my AZ rounds last year– I met Mary aka Viola Fury on a discussion via this blog. I met Samantha while participating in her music-fiction collaboration projects.

Long and short of it– I spent time with each of them, and they with me, so when I asked for a team to help me out with the A to Z Challenge, and they responded, I was over the moon. This is a great bunch of ladies spending time together, helping build a community, sharing their lives, their interests, and their time with each other.

Imho, making blogging friends is all about taking the time out to meet other bloggers and spending time with them, the way Lee has done with the A to Z Challenge, Alex with the Insecure Writers Support Group and DL with the Blitz. Join all of these if you’re a new blogger, and you’re guaranteed a way to make new friends, and your own blogging family!

—-

How do you make blogging friends? Do you interact with your blog friends on social media? Have you started or taking part in a blogging support community that we should know about?

167 thoughts on “How Do You Make #Blogging Friends?

  1. Pingback: #AtoZ Reflections and Five More Writers | JaniceHeck

  2. Pingback: If you could give just One #blogging tip, what would it be? | Daily (w)rite

  3. Sometimes when I read posts like yours… I have gone through some just now, I feel an underachiever….meaning, how am I going to write AND be a techie type person who can do all these amazing things these people do? But never mind, I CAN admire and I do like what you are saying. I’ll do first things first and keep reading posts like yours to feel the vibrancy of the blogoshere. Nice to meet you Damyanti….

  4. I’m just starting out as a blogger, and finding much of interest in your blog, Damyanti. I’m torn about how to approach the issue of traffic. My gut tells me to put as much focus as I can into content. I’m certainly going to consider the A-Z Challenge and the Blitz.

  5. Great post. I often meet people who tell me they love my blog yet I get very few comments. I do now make time to read more blogs and comment. It’s really just polite to leave a quick message. We wouldn’t go and visit someone’s home and leave without saying “Hello.” xx

  6. This is a very enlightening and true post. I’ve have met many wonderful people via of blogging and gained a plethora of priceless knowledge from their writings, and our conversations together. Bloggers are also some of the most supportive, and motivational people you’re going to encounter online.

  7. I started blogging way back in 2000 or 2001 on a site called opendiary. They’ve recently shut down permanently, but I learned much there. I met people and made lifelong friendships with people all over the world. Some of the best friends I have came from that site. One in particular, which has a fantastically interesting story, is a gentleman a few years younger than myself named Nick. At the time I “met” him on opendiary, he was a weather observer in Antarctica. He had been in the military (poor kid with no options), been all over the world by the time he was 25, and went on to spend seven seasons in Antarctica. I finally met him in 2005 when he came to visit me in Arizona. He pretended to be gay because my ex-husband was a jealous, paranoid man. After a week of pretending, and convincingly at that, to be gay, I snuck him on a trip to Mexico that my ex-husband refused to go on for a close friend’s wedding. He got to go to a country he’d never seen and take a fantastic vacation, two weeks in all, with someone he’d never met in person until I picked him up at the airport. I consider him a brother and love him a great deal. He’s been around longer than my ex ended up being. There are many others that I met this same way, a lawyer that worked in D.C. and walked the halls of Congress, artists from California, and a transgendered man from Texas. I value these relationships a great deal. Often the people I know online are around for more than the people I know from “real life.” I had to relocate to a completely unfamiliar city after I was divorced. The only person I knew here was my mother and she’d only come here because of her job. I still want and need the support of friends, so those I’ve met online have became even more important when I found myself in an unfamiliar place surrounded by strangers.

    I made these friends by reading their blogs (or diaries), often reading everything they had posted, and commenting. Some found me and did the same. Either way, comments lead to acquaintances, which lead to reading current events in their lives and becoming invested, which lead to being friends. There were instances where someone ended up being fake and it hurt to know you’d played into their story, but that was and is rare. Even with that happening occasionally, it is still worth it. I wouldn’t trade my friends for anything.

  8. Hi Damyanti,
    To be honest with you if you didn’t follow my blog which I opened in wordpress.com probably about a week ago, I will never know that you exist. If you can call that honesty, that’s just my mind pouring out the truth. I lurked at a few site that I’ve decided to follow, took me awhile to leave my first comment. SCARED? Yes, I don’t have that much confidence that they will like me. I’m just a mother and what do I know about blogging and marketing. My life centered only with my children and my garden..no one will be interested. And yet here I am now, typing my message to the fifth(5) follower of my blog. Thank you for doing so. And yes, thank you for welcoming me.

  9. «compulsive lurker» … Good one! :)
    It sure takes investment in time, that’s for sure, so one has to choose carefully, if one wants it to become a meaningful blogging experience. When I first started [I've had another blog before this], I subscribed to too many, and it would have become a full time job if I’d wanted to interact with all of them. I lurk a little at first … read to see if there could possibly be a common denominator.

  10. I wonder if this comment of mine reached you Damyanti. if you use another template, it will be possible for the latest post to appear at the top and since your comments list is too long, it will help us to comment quickly on the top … You liked my post about Elections, but did not leave a comment or your view about democracy

  11. I finally decided to get my butt in gear and make my blog yesterday and I am so grateful that I have found out about this. I never really looked at blogging as a way of becoming part of a community, but after reading this post, I am beyond excited for April to just get here already!

  12. I am doing the a to z challenge this year; explain about the teams? I am finding, SO SURPRISINGLY, that I am making friends through the internet. Omigoddess! So I loved this post. And yes, putting time in and giving a crap about them is important.

  13. Wow! I have been trying to blog on a consistent basis for a while, but it’s been so hard to really get into it. I think having a network of fellow bloggers is exactly what i need to stay motivated, supported, and inspired!

  14. This was really nice to read specially because before I never had the courage to post any comments. Its nice to know that other people know what it is like. Now, I am much better about commenting and replying to people.
    Blogging is a way for people to connect over common things over the internet

  15. Oh no! I’m a lurker, lol! I so enjoyed reading this post. I JUST decided I would try welcoming new followers and commenting on other blogs in hopes it would help me build followers. Wish me luck:)

  16. Pingback: 20 tips to leverage social media #atozchallenge - Vidya Sury

  17. Amazed that people even bother to read my crap, I’ve found that this instant sense of community draws you in and makes you want to participate. I find myself reading more and exploring more, picking tags at random to muddle through when I find 10-20 minutes. It’s not only healthier for your mind, its healthier for the idea of community (which I always understood to be a group working for the common good of all) and if you can find someone who really looks like they need a kind word, or some encouragement, its your duty as a citizen of the community to speak up, to engage, and who knows, you might just learn something.

  18. Beautiful post. I find blogging is similar to building relationships outside of the internet. Imagine being in a classroom and it’s the middle of the semester, where a new student suddenly walks in. They feel completely out of place because well, it’s the middle of the semester and they know no one. I introduce myself and make them feel welcome. Eventually, their sense of newness disappears because of this. We are a community no different than a classroom.

    We may have different content but classrooms have different students. However, their purpose is the same; graduating. Our purpose is to write. I like what this post mentioned, and though I’m new, I try to both like and comment whenever I sign on.

    Great post.

  19. Interesting post. Although I do occasionally comment on blogs, the idea of a support group/community never occurred to me, perhaps also because my visits to WordPress are not too frequent, so I don’t get a chance to read my fellow bloggers’ posts as much as I would like to. But when a conversation does happen, it is always so engaging. Thanks for following, and looking forward to reading more of your posts. :)

  20. As we are just a two-headed turtle, all of this is very new to us. But we are following what is beign said here and have tentatively reached out a foot to test the water. Got any worms?

I love comments, and I always visit back. Blogging is all about being a part of a community, and communities are about communication! Tweet me up @damyantig !

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